• Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • Scientists fear deep-sea mining

    Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.

    published: 06 Sep 2016
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

    Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.

    published: 01 Oct 2011
  • Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

    Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf

    published: 21 Apr 2017
  • How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

    Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far ric...

    published: 07 Jun 2014
  • JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

    In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016

    published: 31 Mar 2016
  • DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining

    Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461

    published: 07 Jun 2017
  • Deep sea mining: Seas At Risk's statement at the UN Ocean Conference

    At the Ocean Conference of the United Nations, Seas At Risk, supported by its 34 members and Mission Blue, BLOOM, the Deep Sea Mining Campaign and Earthworks, called on the international community to stop deep sea mining in its tracks.

    published: 13 Jun 2017
  • Ocean mining [5]

    published: 24 Jul 2015
  • Global Sustainable Electricity, Fresh Water, and Deep-Ocean Mining from Marshall Hydrothermal

    investorrelations@marshallhydrothermal.com, http://www.marshallhydrothermal.com. US Hydrothermal, LLC, a pre-IPO subsidiary of Marshall Hydrothermal US,LLC, is providing the world with the first and only patented solution to unlock the awesome potential from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The Marshall Hydrothermal Recovery System (MHRS) has the ability to provide utility scale base load electrical power, millions of gallons of desalinated water, and extensive mineral/metal/resource mining capability. US Hydrothermal, LLC provides expert consulting support and guidance to our partners in various countries to ensure smooth and efficient implementation of the MHRS solution. All inquiries welcome.

    published: 02 Mar 2008
  • The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

    The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean

    published: 14 Dec 2016
  • Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

    We're depleting many of our land-based stores of minerals, and remote though it is, the bottom of the ocean is a likelier source of precious minerals than asteroids. It is strewn with deposits rich in gold, copper, manganese, cobalt, and other resources that supply our electronics, green technology, and other vital tools like medical imaging machines. Since no one has tried mining the seafloor yet, much remains uncertain about how it will work — or how much it will disturb the creatures that make their homes at the bottom of the ocean. http://www.nbcnews.com/mach/innovation/these-fearsome-robots-will-bring-mining-deep-ocean-n724901?cid=public-rss_20170227 http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com

    published: 27 Feb 2017
  • Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

    This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This ...

    published: 07 Aug 2014
  • Deep Sea Mining by CCARoboChamp

    2015 Robofest exhibition for Michigan championship

    published: 29 Apr 2015
  • Breaking the Surface - The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific

    The world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the Pacific island nation of Papua New Guinea in early 2018. In this short film we explore how the two Pacific Island nations of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu are working together with their communities to manage the future opportunities and impacts associated with this emerging industry. W​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several Pacific Island nations, questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods.

    published: 26 Nov 2015
  • Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

    In many areas of high volcanic activity, water seeps into the sub-surface where it is intensely heated and then finds its way to the surface again. Examples on the land include hot springs in therapeutic spas, and special types like geysers and fumaroles. In the ocean, this circulation occurs most commonly at the mid-ocean ridge, the world's longest mountain chain. Here, far below the depth of sunlight penetration, hydrothermal vents at over 400°C with their dissolved compounds provide the basis for complex ecosystems. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39tDf5r2no0

    published: 05 Apr 2013
  • The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

    The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be gr...

    published: 23 Mar 2017
  • Deep Sea Mining

    published: 13 Mar 2014
  • Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

    The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.

    published: 26 Mar 2017
  • Royal NIOZ & STW - Ecology research on Deep Sea Mining - Azores

    Can valuable mineral resources on the ocean floor be responsibly mined? To answer this question, we need to know much more about the deep-sea environments where these minerals occur in high concentrations. In April 2015, an international team of marine scientists sailed with the Dutch research vessel 'Pelagia' of Royal NIOZ to a site southwest of the Azores. Their mission: to collect data and perform experiments around a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located on the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Sulfide minerals precipitating from the hydrothermal exhausts locally form massive sulfide deposits at the seafloor. In places where hydrothermal activity has ceased, these mineral deposits may become economically viable mining sites. Scientific understanding of the key geological, oceanographic and biolog...

    published: 25 Jan 2016
  • Scientific Deep Sea Drilling and Coring Technology

    The video shows scientific ocean drilling and coring technology. Scientific Deep Sea Drilling Vessel CHIKYU is the state-of-the-art research vessel exploring the deep earth by sampling, measuring and monitoring operated by JAMSTEC. The Earth deep below the seafloor contains a unique record of our planet's evolution and structure. Scientists study the sub-seafloor to better understand Earth's components, history, and phenomena. This research helps us answer questions about fundamental aspects of our planet such as the environment, the biosphere, solid earth cycles, and geodynamics. 00:00 The process of deep sea drilling 04:04 Rotary drilling 05:23 Riser drilling system 07:30 Coring procedure 10:38 Core sample processing More about the research vessel CHIKYU, http://www.jamstec.go.jp/chik...

    published: 13 Nov 2013
  • UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

    A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.

    published: 14 Mar 2013
developed with YouTube
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 29376
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 19079
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
Scientists fear deep-sea mining

Scientists fear deep-sea mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:01
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2016
  • views: 3567
videos
Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
https://wn.com/Scientists_Fear_Deep_Sea_Mining
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 3856
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2011
  • views: 23122
videos
Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
https://wn.com/Nautilus_Animated_Industrial.Mp4
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:36
  • Updated: 21 Apr 2017
  • views: 4878
videos
Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Leave_My_Down_Below_Alone
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2014
  • views: 22352
videos
Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release.
https://wn.com/How_A_Canadian_Company_Will_Mine_The_Sea_Bed_Near_Papua_New_Guinea
JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:08
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2016
  • views: 917
videos
In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016
https://wn.com/Jpi_Oceans_Ecological_Aspects_Of_Deep_Sea_Mining
DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining

DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:55
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2017
  • views: 140
videos
Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_|_Ocean_Mining
Deep sea mining: Seas At Risk's statement at the UN Ocean Conference

Deep sea mining: Seas At Risk's statement at the UN Ocean Conference

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:06
  • Updated: 13 Jun 2017
  • views: 206
videos
At the Ocean Conference of the United Nations, Seas At Risk, supported by its 34 members and Mission Blue, BLOOM, the Deep Sea Mining Campaign and Earthworks, called on the international community to stop deep sea mining in its tracks.
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Seas_At_Risk's_Statement_At_The_Un_Ocean_Conference
Ocean mining [5]

Ocean mining [5]

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:24
  • Updated: 24 Jul 2015
  • views: 11
videos
https://wn.com/Ocean_Mining_5
Global Sustainable Electricity, Fresh Water, and Deep-Ocean Mining from Marshall Hydrothermal

Global Sustainable Electricity, Fresh Water, and Deep-Ocean Mining from Marshall Hydrothermal

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:30
  • Updated: 02 Mar 2008
  • views: 85631
videos
investorrelations@marshallhydrothermal.com, http://www.marshallhydrothermal.com. US Hydrothermal, LLC, a pre-IPO subsidiary of Marshall Hydrothermal US,LLC, is providing the world with the first and only patented solution to unlock the awesome potential from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The Marshall Hydrothermal Recovery System (MHRS) has the ability to provide utility scale base load electrical power, millions of gallons of desalinated water, and extensive mineral/metal/resource mining capability. US Hydrothermal, LLC provides expert consulting support and guidance to our partners in various countries to ensure smooth and efficient implementation of the MHRS solution. All inquiries welcome.
https://wn.com/Global_Sustainable_Electricity,_Fresh_Water,_And_Deep_Ocean_Mining_From_Marshall_Hydrothermal
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:45
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2016
  • views: 587
videos
The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
https://wn.com/The_Next_Frontier_In_Mining_Deep_Sea_Exploitation_In_The_Pacific
Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:34
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2017
  • views: 256
videos
We're depleting many of our land-based stores of minerals, and remote though it is, the bottom of the ocean is a likelier source of precious minerals than asteroids. It is strewn with deposits rich in gold, copper, manganese, cobalt, and other resources that supply our electronics, green technology, and other vital tools like medical imaging machines. Since no one has tried mining the seafloor yet, much remains uncertain about how it will work — or how much it will disturb the creatures that make their homes at the bottom of the ocean. http://www.nbcnews.com/mach/innovation/these-fearsome-robots-will-bring-mining-deep-ocean-n724901?cid=public-rss_20170227 http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_Just_Around_The_Corner
Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:30
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2014
  • views: 9597
videos
This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms.[5] She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Ocean_Mining_Hughes_Glomar_Explorer_Project_Azorian_21050
Deep Sea Mining by CCARoboChamp

Deep Sea Mining by CCARoboChamp

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:28
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2015
  • views: 135
videos
2015 Robofest exhibition for Michigan championship
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_By_Ccarobochamp
Breaking the Surface - The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific

Breaking the Surface - The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:37
  • Updated: 26 Nov 2015
  • views: 1662
videos
The world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the Pacific island nation of Papua New Guinea in early 2018. In this short film we explore how the two Pacific Island nations of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu are working together with their communities to manage the future opportunities and impacts associated with this emerging industry. W​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several Pacific Island nations, questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods.
https://wn.com/Breaking_The_Surface_The_Future_Of_Deep_Sea_Mining_In_The_Pacific
Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:23
  • Updated: 05 Apr 2013
  • views: 85146
videos
In many areas of high volcanic activity, water seeps into the sub-surface where it is intensely heated and then finds its way to the surface again. Examples on the land include hot springs in therapeutic spas, and special types like geysers and fumaroles. In the ocean, this circulation occurs most commonly at the mid-ocean ridge, the world's longest mountain chain. Here, far below the depth of sunlight penetration, hydrothermal vents at over 400°C with their dissolved compounds provide the basis for complex ecosystems. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39tDf5r2no0
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents_In_The_Deep_Sea
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:49
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2017
  • views: 305123
videos
The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/The_Deep_Ocean_Is_The_Final_Frontier_On_Planet_Earth
Deep Sea Mining

Deep Sea Mining

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  • Duration: 2:14
  • Updated: 13 Mar 2014
  • views: 436
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https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining
Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

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  • Duration: 8:13
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2017
  • views: 1900
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The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.
https://wn.com/Destroying_The_Oceans,_World’S_First_Deep_Sea_Mining_Venture
Royal NIOZ & STW - Ecology research on Deep Sea Mining - Azores

Royal NIOZ & STW - Ecology research on Deep Sea Mining - Azores

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  • Duration: 10:45
  • Updated: 25 Jan 2016
  • views: 257
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Can valuable mineral resources on the ocean floor be responsibly mined? To answer this question, we need to know much more about the deep-sea environments where these minerals occur in high concentrations. In April 2015, an international team of marine scientists sailed with the Dutch research vessel 'Pelagia' of Royal NIOZ to a site southwest of the Azores. Their mission: to collect data and perform experiments around a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located on the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Sulfide minerals precipitating from the hydrothermal exhausts locally form massive sulfide deposits at the seafloor. In places where hydrothermal activity has ceased, these mineral deposits may become economically viable mining sites. Scientific understanding of the key geological, oceanographic and biological processes at those sites is of pivotal importance for policy makers to weigh the potential gain of valuable minerals against the potential environmental risks of deep sea mining.
https://wn.com/Royal_Nioz_Stw_Ecology_Research_On_Deep_Sea_Mining_Azores
Scientific Deep Sea Drilling and Coring Technology

Scientific Deep Sea Drilling and Coring Technology

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  • Duration: 14:53
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2013
  • views: 99433
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The video shows scientific ocean drilling and coring technology. Scientific Deep Sea Drilling Vessel CHIKYU is the state-of-the-art research vessel exploring the deep earth by sampling, measuring and monitoring operated by JAMSTEC. The Earth deep below the seafloor contains a unique record of our planet's evolution and structure. Scientists study the sub-seafloor to better understand Earth's components, history, and phenomena. This research helps us answer questions about fundamental aspects of our planet such as the environment, the biosphere, solid earth cycles, and geodynamics. 00:00 The process of deep sea drilling 04:04 Rotary drilling 05:23 Riser drilling system 07:30 Coring procedure 10:38 Core sample processing More about the research vessel CHIKYU, http://www.jamstec.go.jp/chikyu/ (C) JAMSTEC
https://wn.com/Scientific_Deep_Sea_Drilling_And_Coring_Technology
UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

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  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2013
  • views: 1561
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A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.
https://wn.com/UK_Firm_In_Deep_Sea_Mining_Plan_For_Minerals
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